Ed Boaden

I am an interface designer at Bleep.com in London.
I have a passion for objects that are beautiful, ideas that are elegant, and things that make me smile.
@edboaden / Pinterest / VSCO

Kelis singles: Friday Fish Fry
Creative direction and artwork by Lief Podhajsky.

Kelis singles: Friday Fish Fry

Creative direction and artwork by Lief Podhajsky.

#graphic design
21 October
Recent work: Album streaming on Bleep
Clark album available for customers who have pre-ordered on Bleep.
Following on from related work for Flying Lotus – You’re Dead!

Recent work: Album streaming on Bleep

Clark album available for customers who have pre-ordered on Bleep.

Following on from related work for Flying Lotus – You’re Dead!

#work
21 October
Typeface by Marc Donaldson

Typeface by Marc Donaldson

#graphic design #Typography
21 October
Orbital, Wonky

Orbital, Wonky

(Source: andren, via gradientdelay)

19 October
15folds:

Transition
The work is an investigation of the theme extinction in the minimum aesthetic and moving way in opposition of the baroque and drama in which the theme have been represented in the past. The serious black color that engage with the theme is contrasted by a funny everyday animation that we are accustomed to see on the internet but it suggest the end of a period too, something that is over in a perpetual loop. Is a vision of the extinction in a contemporary valanced serious/funny way.
By Manuel Fernández , Artist, Madrid
As part of the Extinction Marathon 15folds has collaborated with the Serpentine Galleries. You can follow this month’s theme at 15folds.com

15folds:

Transition

The work is an investigation of the theme extinction in the minimum aesthetic and moving way in opposition of the baroque and drama in which the theme have been represented in the past. The serious black color that engage with the theme is contrasted by a funny everyday animation that we are accustomed to see on the internet but it suggest the end of a period too, something that is over in a perpetual loop. Is a vision of the extinction in a contemporary valanced serious/funny way.

By Manuel Fernández , Artist, Madrid

As part of the Extinction Marathon 15folds has collaborated with the Serpentine Galleries. You can follow this month’s theme at 15folds.com

17 October
East by GEO

East by GEO

#graphic design
17 October
DROID phone case – for playing Metal Gear Solid V on iPhone.
via l-a-n

DROID phone case – for playing Metal Gear Solid V on iPhone.

via l-a-n

16 October
Neo Tokyo / Akira

Neo Tokyo / Akira

(Source: starsfive, via gradientdelay)

16 October
Driverless car.
via Dezeen

Driverless car.

via Dezeen

14 October
Mountain graph by Seth Eckert
via Dribbble

Mountain graph by Seth Eckert

via Dribbble

#gif #infographics
9 October
charleshuettner:

I was looking through old flash files and remembered this background animation loop that was cut short in the final video.

charleshuettner:

I was looking through old flash files and remembered this background animation loop that was cut short in the final video.

#gif #Illustration
26 September
Aphex Twin – Come to Daddy (1997), The Designers Republic
via Grafik

Aphex Twin – Come to Daddy (1997), The Designers Republic

via Grafik

#graphic design
23 September
Björk love.

Björk love.

(Source: bjjork, via andren)

23 September
Oculus Rift Crescent Bay prototype
via The Verge

Oculus Rift Crescent Bay prototype

via The Verge

22 September

Prof. Dr, Max Bruckner, Four Plates from the Book “Vielecke und Vielflache”, (1900)
Regular convex polyhedra, frequently referenced as “Platonic” solids, are featured prominently in the philosophy of Plato, who spoke about them, rather intuitively, in association to the four classical elements (earth, wind, fire, water… plus ether). However, it was Euclid who actually provided a mathematical description of each solid and found the ratio of the diameter of the circumscribed sphere to the length of the edge and argued that there are no further convex polyhedra than those 5: tetrahedron, hexahedron (also known as the cube), octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron.

via rudy/godinez

Prof. Dr, Max Bruckner, Four Plates from the Book “Vielecke und Vielflache”, (1900)

Regular convex polyhedra, frequently referenced as “Platonic” solids, are featured prominently in the philosophy of Plato, who spoke about them, rather intuitively, in association to the four classical elements (earth, wind, fire, water… plus ether). However, it was Euclid who actually provided a mathematical description of each solid and found the ratio of the diameter of the circumscribed sphere to the length of the edge and argued that there are no further convex polyhedra than those 5: tetrahedron, hexahedron (also known as the cube), octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron.

via rudy/godinez

22 September